Monthly Archives: March 2017

Bangin’ Chicken (paleo)

Seriously banging. This chicken packs a massive flavour punch and will absolutely have your tastebuds doing a happy dance. I don’t even know what else to tell. It’s easy. It’s delicious. You can probably substitute the chicken for some bangin’ pork or beef. If you do, tell me how banging it is on a scale of “relatively banging” to “total mouth party, will you marry me? Banging”. Obviously, I expect the latter. Unless you balls-up the recipe for which I take no responsibility. Go forth & bang.

1/3 cup coconut oil (or ghee)
1/2 kg chicken thighs, chopped
2 rashers bacon, diced
1 red onion, diced
6 garlic cloves, crushed
1 capsicum, chopped
good handful of baby spinach
1 tbsp cumin powder
1/2 tsp cinnamon powder
1/4 tsp ginger powder
1/4 tsp cloves powder
1/4 tsp cardamon powder
Juice 1 lemon
1/2 tsp salt

Heat up the oil in a large frying pan that has a lid over a medium heat. If you don’t have a lid you can use a sheet of alfoil to act like one. Add the chicken, bacon, garlic, onion and salt and allow to brown. Add all the remaining ingredients, aside from the capsicum & spinach and mix well. Cover, reduce the heat to low and allow to cook for 20 mins, stirring occasionally. Add the capsicum & spinach, stir though and allow to cook uncovered for another 5 mins before serving.

Kale, Cranberry & Goats Cheese Salad

I love goats cheese. And cranberries. I’m pretty intolerant to both unfortunately (you can read about my food intolerance testing on the blog) but sometimes I just like to throw caution to the wind, say fu$k it,  and do a number on myself anyway. I’m a rebel moron like that.

Dairy tends to cause me both a pretty immediate gut bloating reaction and a next-few-days skin break out reaction. It’s awesome. Cranberries make my throat all scratchy and itchy, like hayfever, or anaphylaxis. Also awesome. What I have discovered with both of these particular intolerances is that they tend to be dose related. A few cranberries every now and again in my Paleo Hero Muesli, no problem. Cranberry sauce, massive problem.  A bit of cheese once every now and then, all good. A piece of cheesecake and I’ll be rolling around on the floor, clutching my guts, looking 9 months pregnant fairly quickly. All great lessons. And still I sometimes say ‘screw this, pass me the gelati’.

1 bunch kale, core removed & shredded

1/2 cup dried cranberries

4-6 radishes, finely sliced

100g goats cheese (omit if you don’t do well with dairy)

good pinch salt

1 tbs apple cider vinegar

3 tbs olive oil

To remove the core from your kale stalks you just pretty much grab the bottom of the stalk and pull upwards toward the tip of the leaf. The leafy bits should come off and the fiberous stem should stay there. It’s no big deal if a few bits of stem end up in there so don’t spend hours doing this. You don’t have time for that $hit. Move on. Add the kale, salt, ACV & olive oil to a big bowl and get in there with your hands, give it a good massage like its had a big day at work. A couple of minutes should do the trick, you just want it to be a little softer so it doesn’t taste like you are eating horse chaff.

Add the rest of the ingredients, give it a little toss & you are good to go. In hindsight, I think some toasted flaked almonds or walnuts would have been awesome in here too. Whatever floats your boat.

Kimchi (fermented. vegan. paleo)

If you are not on the fermented foods bandwagon yet you need to JUMP ON IMMEDIATELY. Like now. Fermented food is the new black. Adios probiotic capsules & HELLO probiotic rich foods. Not only are fermented foods going to give you more variety of good bacteria in your life but they are so much more potent than even the very best probiotic capsule or powder on the market. By incorporating food containing probiotics we start to establish great long-term, diverse, healthy gut flora far more effectively than if we just take a probiotic supplement. If Kimchi isn’t your jazz then try some other types of fermented veggies, kombucha, kefir, homemade yoghurt etc. The more different types of fermented foods the more diversity of good bacteria you will incorporating into your life. If you don’t know why having a healthy population of bacteria in your gut is important you can get in the know HERE  and HERE but basically everything from skin conditions, weight regulation, mental health, immune function, obesity, fatigue & auto-immune disease.

I have been making kraut for a while but have been hanging out for someone to give me a great kimchi recipe and Jeremy came through with the goods! This was also my first time using my new crock from KINFOLK & CO!!  This recipe comes courtesy of the awesome Jeremy over at Holistic Lifestyler who is a chiropractor in WA, runs fermenting workshops & has an awesome line of organic clothing that is SO soft & comfy. You can get your mits on his fermenting ebook for only $40 if you tell him I sent you. We’re tight like that. He’ll hook you up. Just email him info@holisticlifestyler.com

Will need approximately 2 Litre sized fermenting vessel, notes on these in the troubleshooting.

Vegetables

Green Cabbage  400 g ; Nappa Cabbage 500g ; Spring onions 100g; Sweet potato 250g; Carrot 100g; Green apple  ½ (100g); Salt approx. 30g (which is around 2% of the vegetable weight, this is important as it’s the researched safe ratio of salt to vegetable to provide the optimal environment for fermenting) I recommend good quality Celtic sea salt.

Paste

Fresh Red Chilli 2 ; Turmeric powder 1-2tsp; Cayenne Pepper powder 2 tsp; Chilli Flakes 1 tsp; Garlic 4 cloves; Ginger 4cm grated

Procedure

  • Finely chop green cabbage, add salt; massage until brine created
  • Chop the end off the nappa cabbage then chop into approx. 3 cm square pieces then chop the spring onions add to green cabbage and massage for a few minutes
  • Shred the carrot and sweet potato. Place the green apple through the mandolin or finely slice (if mandolin not available), add to the mix [Note: carrot & sweet potato could also be put through the mandolin if you prefer a slightly chunkier kraut]

PASTE

  • Finely chop the chilli, grate the ginger, chop the garlic, add the cayenne, turmeric and chilli flakes. Blend all the ingredients adding filter water as needed to create a paste consistency.
  • Add the paste to the vegetable mixture and mix through.

 

 Options; can add some dulse or wakame flakes into the mix, some fresh chives can be added to the paste.  Instead of water added to the paste mix some good quality fish sauce can be used may need to go a little lighter in the salt in the vegetable mix as fish sauce is quite salty.  Daikon radish also can be added which adds a nice crunch.  Korean Chilli powder can be added and is very nice and provides a deep red colour, this is usually found at specialist Asian food stores.

 

FERMENTING

  • Pack ingredients into the jar, so that the vegetables are under the brine that has been created. Close the vessel
  • Ferment at room temperature ideally 18-22 deg Celsius for 2-4 weeks before transferring to the refrigerator.
  • Once in the refrigerator should last upto a year (although you’ll get through it much faster than that because it’s so delicious!)

TROUBLESHOOTING

  • If the vegetables start to rise above the brine at the top during the fermenting period simply remove the lid and with the back of a clean spoon push vegetables back under the brine and close the lid again. Alternatively you can add some kind of weight device to keep the vegetables submerged under the brine.
  • If your environment is quite hot the fermenting period may need to be less for instance more like 10 days. If its cooler may need the full 4 weeks.  There’s no way of telling when the ferment is ‘done’ on a home scale type set up without testing things like pH etc but sticking to the timeframe suggested is a safe reliable timeframe.
  • Jars:
    • My personal preference is the ‘Fido’ wire bail lid type which can be found on line at kitchen stores. Otherwise The Fowlers-Vacola jars I’ve found to be the most reliable as the lid never loses its tensile strength like the wire bail types which tend to become faulty after a few years use and no longer create a 100% sealed environment.  The downside to the Fowlers jar is they only make them in 1 Litre size now so you have to make them in batches.  There are many other ‘specialised’ fermenting jars out there that are more expensive but they really are no more beneficial than the two mentioned.  If you want to upsize your fermenting then fermenting crocks are a great option.

 

 

Roasted Cauliflower & Green Tahini Dressing (paleo. vegan. gf. df)

If you haven’t roasted cauliflower before you are missing out. Seriously. Your life is lacking. It’s bloody tremendous just roasted with a bit of butter & turmeric but this jazz right here is next level. The green dressing packs a punch of both flavour and nutrition and both spinach and tahini are going to give you a cracking dose of calcium. I’d totally reccomend making this salad as a double batch so you have leftovers for the next day… or eat all of it at once. Whatever spins your tyres.

Dressing
1 packed cup baby spinach
1/3 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup Apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup tahini
Good pinch salt & pepper
1/4 cup olive or avocado oil
1 tbs raw honey/maple syrup

1 head cauliflower, roughly chopped
1 tbs sumac
1/2 cup flaked almonds, lightly toasted
1/2 cup parsley, chopped

Preheat your oven to 180C. Line a baking tray with baking paper and pop the cauliflower pieces on it. Sprinkle the cauliflower with the sumac and a good drizzle of olive oil then use your hands or whatever you like to mix it around to coat. Bake for 40mins or until golden on the edges. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly.

Pop all the dressing ingredients into your food processor or high speed blender and blend until smooth. Pop the cauliflower onto a serving platter, drizzle with the dressing then sprinkle with parsley & almonds.