Salads

Kale, Cranberry & Goats Cheese Salad

I love goats cheese. And cranberries. I’m pretty intolerant to both unfortunately (you can read about my food intolerance testing on the blog) but sometimes I just like to throw caution to the wind, say fu$k it,  and do a number on myself anyway. I’m a rebel moron like that.

Dairy tends to cause me both a pretty immediate gut bloating reaction and a next-few-days skin break out reaction. It’s awesome. Cranberries make my throat all scratchy and itchy, like hayfever, or anaphylaxis. Also awesome. What I have discovered with both of these particular intolerances is that they tend to be dose related. A few cranberries every now and again in my Paleo Hero Muesli, no problem. Cranberry sauce, massive problem.  A bit of cheese once every now and then, all good. A piece of cheesecake and I’ll be rolling around on the floor, clutching my guts, looking 9 months pregnant fairly quickly. All great lessons. And still I sometimes say ‘screw this, pass me the gelati’.

1 bunch kale, core removed & shredded

1/2 cup dried cranberries

4-6 radishes, finely sliced

100g goats cheese (omit if you don’t do well with dairy)

good pinch salt

1 tbs apple cider vinegar

3 tbs olive oil

To remove the core from your kale stalks you just pretty much grab the bottom of the stalk and pull upwards toward the tip of the leaf. The leafy bits should come off and the fiberous stem should stay there. It’s no big deal if a few bits of stem end up in there so don’t spend hours doing this. You don’t have time for that $hit. Move on. Add the kale, salt, ACV & olive oil to a big bowl and get in there with your hands, give it a good massage like its had a big day at work. A couple of minutes should do the trick, you just want it to be a little softer so it doesn’t taste like you are eating horse chaff.

Add the rest of the ingredients, give it a little toss & you are good to go. In hindsight, I think some toasted flaked almonds or walnuts would have been awesome in here too. Whatever floats your boat.

Kimchi (fermented. vegan. paleo)

If you are not on the fermented foods bandwagon yet you need to JUMP ON IMMEDIATELY. Like now. Fermented food is the new black. Adios probiotic capsules & HELLO probiotic rich foods. Not only are fermented foods going to give you more variety of good bacteria in your life but they are so much more potent than even the very best probiotic capsule or powder on the market. By incorporating food containing probiotics we start to establish great long-term, diverse, healthy gut flora far more effectively than if we just take a probiotic supplement. If Kimchi isn’t your jazz then try some other types of fermented veggies, kombucha, kefir, homemade yoghurt etc. The more different types of fermented foods the more diversity of good bacteria you will incorporating into your life. If you don’t know why having a healthy population of bacteria in your gut is important you can get in the know HERE  and HERE but basically everything from skin conditions, weight regulation, mental health, immune function, obesity, fatigue & auto-immune disease.

I have been making kraut for a while but have been hanging out for someone to give me a great kimchi recipe and Jeremy came through with the goods! This was also my first time using my new crock from KINFOLK & CO!!  This recipe comes courtesy of the awesome Jeremy over at Holistic Lifestyler who is a chiropractor in WA, runs fermenting workshops & has an awesome line of organic clothing that is SO soft & comfy. You can get your mits on his fermenting ebook for only $40 if you tell him I sent you. We’re tight like that. He’ll hook you up. Just email him info@holisticlifestyler.com

Will need approximately 2 Litre sized fermenting vessel, notes on these in the troubleshooting.

Vegetables

Green Cabbage  400 g ; Nappa Cabbage 500g ; Spring onions 100g; Sweet potato 250g; Carrot 100g; Green apple  ½ (100g); Salt approx. 30g (which is around 2% of the vegetable weight, this is important as it’s the researched safe ratio of salt to vegetable to provide the optimal environment for fermenting) I recommend good quality Celtic sea salt.

Paste

Fresh Red Chilli 2 ; Turmeric powder 1-2tsp; Cayenne Pepper powder 2 tsp; Chilli Flakes 1 tsp; Garlic 4 cloves; Ginger 4cm grated

Procedure

  • Finely chop green cabbage, add salt; massage until brine created
  • Chop the end off the nappa cabbage then chop into approx. 3 cm square pieces then chop the spring onions add to green cabbage and massage for a few minutes
  • Shred the carrot and sweet potato. Place the green apple through the mandolin or finely slice (if mandolin not available), add to the mix [Note: carrot & sweet potato could also be put through the mandolin if you prefer a slightly chunkier kraut]

PASTE

  • Finely chop the chilli, grate the ginger, chop the garlic, add the cayenne, turmeric and chilli flakes. Blend all the ingredients adding filter water as needed to create a paste consistency.
  • Add the paste to the vegetable mixture and mix through.

 

 Options; can add some dulse or wakame flakes into the mix, some fresh chives can be added to the paste.  Instead of water added to the paste mix some good quality fish sauce can be used may need to go a little lighter in the salt in the vegetable mix as fish sauce is quite salty.  Daikon radish also can be added which adds a nice crunch.  Korean Chilli powder can be added and is very nice and provides a deep red colour, this is usually found at specialist Asian food stores.

 

FERMENTING

  • Pack ingredients into the jar, so that the vegetables are under the brine that has been created. Close the vessel
  • Ferment at room temperature ideally 18-22 deg Celsius for 2-4 weeks before transferring to the refrigerator.
  • Once in the refrigerator should last upto a year (although you’ll get through it much faster than that because it’s so delicious!)

TROUBLESHOOTING

  • If the vegetables start to rise above the brine at the top during the fermenting period simply remove the lid and with the back of a clean spoon push vegetables back under the brine and close the lid again. Alternatively you can add some kind of weight device to keep the vegetables submerged under the brine.
  • If your environment is quite hot the fermenting period may need to be less for instance more like 10 days. If its cooler may need the full 4 weeks.  There’s no way of telling when the ferment is ‘done’ on a home scale type set up without testing things like pH etc but sticking to the timeframe suggested is a safe reliable timeframe.
  • Jars:
    • My personal preference is the ‘Fido’ wire bail lid type which can be found on line at kitchen stores. Otherwise The Fowlers-Vacola jars I’ve found to be the most reliable as the lid never loses its tensile strength like the wire bail types which tend to become faulty after a few years use and no longer create a 100% sealed environment.  The downside to the Fowlers jar is they only make them in 1 Litre size now so you have to make them in batches.  There are many other ‘specialised’ fermenting jars out there that are more expensive but they really are no more beneficial than the two mentioned.  If you want to upsize your fermenting then fermenting crocks are a great option.

 

 

Roasted Cauliflower & Green Tahini Dressing (paleo. vegan. gf. df)

If you haven’t roasted cauliflower before you are missing out. Seriously. Your life is lacking. It’s bloody tremendous just roasted with a bit of butter & turmeric but this jazz right here is next level. The green dressing packs a punch of both flavour and nutrition and both spinach and tahini are going to give you a cracking dose of calcium. I’d totally reccomend making this salad as a double batch so you have leftovers for the next day… or eat all of it at once. Whatever spins your tyres.

Dressing
1 packed cup baby spinach
1/3 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup Apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup tahini
Good pinch salt & pepper
1/4 cup olive or avocado oil
1 tbs raw honey/maple syrup

1 head cauliflower, roughly chopped
1 tbs sumac
1/2 cup flaked almonds, lightly toasted
1/2 cup parsley, chopped

Preheat your oven to 180C. Line a baking tray with baking paper and pop the cauliflower pieces on it. Sprinkle the cauliflower with the sumac and a good drizzle of olive oil then use your hands or whatever you like to mix it around to coat. Bake for 40mins or until golden on the edges. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool slightly.

Pop all the dressing ingredients into your food processor or high speed blender and blend until smooth. Pop the cauliflower onto a serving platter, drizzle with the dressing then sprinkle with parsley & almonds.

Loaded Slaw (paleo. vegetarian. probiotic)

Remember that dodgy-as coleslaw you get pre-packaged at the supermarket or from Red Rooster? You’re with me right? I mean it’s NOT good for you but damn that stuff tasted good back in the day and it had a really specific tang that made it taste totally different to homemade stuff (please no-one tell me what that ‘tang’ was, I’d feel better not knowing). Anyway, no matter how often I make coleslaw it doesn’t have that….. until now. It’s the kraut. It totally tangs it up. This is also ‘loaded’ because it is a total veggie-fest and if you use my fermented mayo & the kraut your guts are going to be in probiotic heaven. How good.

1/2 head cabbage, shredded (I used red but whatever spins your tyres)

1/2 head broccoli, grated

1 cup grated zucchini

1 cup cabbage kraut (or kraut of your choice, carrot would be awesome)

1 cup MAYO (or greek yoghurt if you do ok with dairy)

So it’s pretty complicated from here on in so listen closely. Oh you can’t hear me. Right. Read carefully…. You put it all in a bowl & mix it together well. You get that? Tough right. You’ve got this. Good job.

loaded slaw2

 

CBF Paleo for Kids- For people who really want to feed their kids well but Can’t Be Fu*ked

I did it. I wrote another eBook. Well I use the word “wrote” quite loosely, it’s hardly a novel. We can all agree I’m no wordsmith. I put roughly formed sentences and a whole lot of my mindless dribble into another eBook for you. It’s just like my 1st eBook CBF PALEO but with a focus on the small humans in our life. It’s NOT just for little kids though, the recipes are perfect for all the humans in your life, it’s all 5 ingredients or less, nutritional bang for your buck with minimal effort because, let’s be honest, some days you just CBF.

The best part is, it’s less than $9, it’s full of tasty stuff that, if your tiny terrorists throw it on the floor, you’ll enjoy eating it anyway. There are loads of veggies snuck in too of course and it still looks pretty. You can grab your copy here and here’s a sneak peak of some of the pretty things inside.

IMG_1623

 

Roast Cauliflower & Broccoli Salad

Ok, so if you have not ventured to the land of roasted cauliflower or broccoli yet you have not lived. Steamed schmeamed. Roasting is the way of the future, doesn’t take much longer than steaming it, and tastes ah-mazing. This is about to change your life. Seriously. 

Cruciferous veggies are a powerhouse of nutrition, are loaded with vitamins & fibre and are an excellent food to help support our bodies detoxification pathways. 

1/2 cauliflower, roughly chopped

1/2 broccoli, roughly chopped

1 sweet potato, cubed

2 tbs butter/ghee/coconut oil

1/4 cup chopped parsley

2 tbs hemp seeds (optional), I use THIS BRAND

Dressing-

1 tsp Dijon mustard

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar or lemon juice

1/2 cup olive oil

Salt and pepper 

Preheat your oven to 200C. Line a large baking tray with baking paper. Whack the sweet potato on and add half the butter and pop it in the oven for 20mins. Pull it out, add the cauliflower & broccoli plus the rest of the butter (let’s be honest, I probably added double that amount of butter because I bloody love butter but you do whatever spins your tyres) and pop it back in the oven for about another 20mins until all the veggies are cooked. You might want to pull it out after 5-10 mins and give it a good mix around so the butter gets to spread its love. Set aside to cool while you make your dressing. For the dressing, get a small jar or container with an airtight lid. Add all the dressing ingredients & shake the bejesus out of it until it is all combined. Add the roasted veggies to a big bowl, sprinkle over the parsley, drizzle with the dressing and toss well. Finally sprinkle over the hemp seeds and serve it up. 

Honey Mustard Carrots

As the name suggests, these are carrots with honey and mustard. It’s not a trick. My creative genius with naming my recipes is obviously dwindling. Anyway, I found loads of beautiful, colourful carrots at the markets this morning while I was on the hunt for cauliflower. Great find on the carrots, meanwhile the cauliflower was $8 a head. I $hit you not. It wasn’t even gold plated or blessed by a unicorn, it was just organic cauliflower. Off their faces. No cauliflower for me. Lucky for you though, you got a cracking carrot recipe. 

12 carrots (I used a mix of orange, purple & yellow ones because they were pretty)

1 tbs seeded mustard

1 tbs honey

1/4 cup oil (coconut/olive/macadamia/melted butter/ghee)

Good crack of salt & pepper

Preheat your oven to 200C. In a bowl mix the honey, mustard & oil until well combined. Chop your carrots however you fancy, I did mine in big chunks. That’s a chef-fy term, ‘chunks’, very descriptive & accurate. Toss the carrots in a big baking tray, pour over the mustard mix & bake those bad boys for 40-50 mins depending on the size of your ‘chunks’.  You can serve these hot out of the oven as a side dish to whatever you fancy or allow to cool then toss through some rocket, walnuts & goats cheese and right there you’ve got a banging salad. Enjoy. 

Potato Salad

Who doesn’t love a good old potato salad? Not that cr@p you get from Coles, the real deal stuff that your aunt used to bring to family BBQ’s! Here’s my version, I used a mix of orange & white sweet potatoes but regular white potatoes are just fine too. Paleo police don’t go losing your mind, they are potatoes for $hits sake. I hardly think that the occasional white potato is responsible for the diabetes & heart disease epidemic we are facing. I’m not talking Macca’s deep fryed in highly toxic trans fat potato in the form of ‘fries’ either so don’t go thinking that’s on the table, it’s not. That’s crappier than Coles potato salad. Onwards with the recipe.

Dressing (it’s mayo, not some fancy schmancy dressing)                   

3 egg yolks

1 cup oil (olive/macadamia/coconut)

1 heaped tsp Dijon mustard

1 tbs seeded mustard

1/4 cup lemon or lime juice

Salt & pepper to taste

4 sweet potatos, chopped into large chunks

1 chorizo, diced (or bacon) or leave out for a vegetarian version 

Optional- handful shredded baby spinach and some chopped boiled eggs

Preheat your oven to 180C and roast your sweet potato/potato for 35-45 mins until cooked. Remove from oven & allow to cool. 

In a food processor/high speed blender/or using an emersion blender, add the egg yolks and Dijon mustard and blend until smooth, with the blender still running, slowly drizzle in the oil so it is being completely incorporated as you go. Finally add the lemon/lime juice, salt, pepper & seeded mustard & give it another good whizz. 

In a frypan cook the chorizo (or bacon) until crispy. Set aside.

In a large bowl, add the cooled sweet potato & chorizo (& any fat in the pan) then drizzle over enough of the dressing to coat the potatoes. Toss gently to combine. If using the baby spinach and/or eggs add these now and give another gentle mix. That’s it. Done. Eat it. 

Crap-Free Coleslaw

Did anyone else used to think it was called ‘coldslaw’ too? I bet you did even if you won’t admit it. You’re only lying to yourself. Anyway, coldslaw makes much more sense than coleslaw because it really is cold ‘slaw’…. I don’t actually know if ‘slaw’ is a thing or if I just made that up? Stand by, I’m off to google it….. Right, so it turns out that ‘slaw’ is not a word, it’s just short for ‘coleslaw’. I also happened upon another fact…. ‘Cole’ is actually derived from the Latin word ‘colis’, meaning ‘cabbage’. Whatever Wikipedia, I still think coldslaw makes much more sense.

This one doesn’t contain the truck-load of cr@p that is in the store-bought versions and is exactly what I felt like in this 57-million-degree-heat. Not even exaggerating, it actually is that hot.

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Creamy Pesto Spaghetti

So I have a new kitchen appliance…. Well it’s not really an appliance as much as a device. I have a Veggie Twister that I have loved up until now. Trav hasn’t loved it so much because he normally gets the task of ‘noodling’ things & the veggie twister can give you a bit of RSI after a while. Recently one of my favorite people Bel from Intensity PT introduced me to the SPIROOLI I can’t believe she has been holding out on me for so long. I considered unfriending her on Facebook but she just had a whole organic lamb delivered to her house & I want to be invited to eat it so I need her for a little longer. Anyway, SPIROOLI has changed my life, it is SOOOOO much easier than the veggie twister, quicker & just way betterer. I don’t know if that’s a word but it should be.

Zucchini is low calorie and a great source of fibre. It is rich in vitamin A, flavonoid and poly-phenolic antioxidants such as carotenes, lutein and zeaxanthin. These compounds help scavenge harmful oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species from the body that play a role in aging and various disease process.

6 zucchini’s, noodled (I used my SPIROOLI)
Big bunch basil
Big bunch parsley
1 cup pistachios, lightly toasted
Juice of 2 lemons
1 tbs apple cider vinegar
1/4 cup olive oil
Pinch salt & pepper
1 lge avocado

Noodle your zucchini & set aside in a big bowl. In your food processor blend the lemon juice, oil, apple cider vinegar & herbs until very well chopped. Add the avocado, salt & pepper & blend until smooth. Add the nuts and pulse a few times to combine. Chuck the pesto on top of the noodles & mix well. I recommend getting in there with your hands and giving it a good mix to get the pesto to properly coat the noodles. Don’t be shy. Hands work way better than any other implement I could find in my kitchen, and I have a cr@pload of implements in my kitchen so trust me on the hands. Now, you can chuck this in a big frypan & gently warm it through if you fancy, we ate ours raw & cold like a salad but I did warm it up the next day when I ate leftovers. Both ways are delicious. Whatever floats your boat.